enfrdeitptrues

Platformer

  • boxart
    Game Info:

    Woodle Tree 2: Worlds
    Developed by: Fabio Ferrara
    Published by: Chubby Pixel
    Release date: September 16, 2016
    Available on: Windows, macOS, Linux
    Genre: Open World Platformer
    Number of players: 1-4 (local or online co-op)
    Price: $3.99

    Thank you, Chubby Pixel, for sending us a review key!

    When a dark force sucks the life and water from the trees in the center of the Wood Lands, a sentient tree stump must become a hero. Alone or with friends, the player guides the stump from snow-capped mountains to sandy islands, from the desert to the lagoon. With little more than a leaf and a double jump, the stump collects small drops of water scattered throughout the game's eight zones. This is not a technically impressive game, nor an especially long one. Nevertheless, for all its simplicity (and, in many cases, thanks to it), Woodle Tree 2: Worlds provides one of the most kid-friendly 3D platforming experiences available.

    Since an open world is a major change from Woodle Tree Adventures, let's start there. The central hub at which the player begins is laid out like the spokes of a wheel, eight trees pointing the directions to different game areas in all corners of the map. In addition to the zones listed above, there are forests, caves, a mountaintop town, canyons, and hills. The world is truly open to exploration, and there are pleasant meadows, rivers, and animal villages wherever the player wanders. Only loading divides the different areas. Frequently there are dark zones overrun with black goo and enemies. Sometimes these protect cosmetic unlockables. Unfortunately, as with the rest of the game world, other times they protect absolutely nothing. The fun flora and fauna of the world make for a nice walk to the main areas, but there is little reason to stay and the graphics do not give much to gawk at. On the other hand, the game shows an impressive amount of distance. After clearing the mountaintop village, I glided off the highest point I could. As I floated back to the center hub, I could see well into several other zones. It was a good view.

    Woodle Tree 2: Worlds
    Highlights:

    Strong Points: Varied terrain means varied platforming; the core gameplay of jumping and gliding scales well to player ability
    Weak Points: Repetitive and bland graphical textures; imprecise combat hinders rather than compliments platforming; camera angle is too restricted; much of the world feels empty
    Moral Warnings: Your character shrinks and disappears if it takes too much damage

    The play areas are colored as well as the plain graphical assets allow. They are more subtly distinguished once you start jumping around. At one end of the map you have to navigate ledges carefully to activate the wooden platform equivalent of a ski lift. Elsewhere you have to dive underwater to find a well-hidden water drop. Trampoline mushrooms, booster flowers, and updrafts lend more variety. These little changes in play mix up the whole experience. The level design consistently and pleasantly surprised me.

    The game often uses yellow brick roads to guide the players who might be too young to appreciate that reference. Collectable berries trace walking and jumping paths. In addition, water drops in your current zone are visible as far as the map can render at once. Combined with the already-impressive draw distance, this ensures that, if you take a look around, you can find a water drop on the horizon and start heading for it. The player will get lost from time to time, and the game will bring him back to the right path. All in all, it is easy to move around the map.

    The basic mechanics are forgiving of inexperienced players. The leaf your stump carries is used to carry water, swat switches or enemies, and glide. This last mechanic provides an unlimited slowed fall, letting the player recover from missed jumps. The water and switches grow/raise platforms and open bridges. Combined with the open world, jumping's versatility furnishes multiple paths through the game world. A cautious player might hop and dodge to a switch in order to lower a door, and a more experienced player might time jumps to avoid the door completely. The freedom to approach gaps and blocks from multiple angles kept the game fresh for me, well outside of the target audience. The game lends itself to casual speedrunning. Intentionally or not, it rewards precise play with shortcuts and risk.

    Woodle Tree 2: Worlds
    Score Breakdown:
    Higher is better
    (10/10 is perfect)

    Game Score - 70%
    Gameplay - 14/20
    Graphics - 6/10
    Sound - 8/10
    Stability - 3/5
    Controls - 4/5

    Morality Score - 98%
    Violence - 9/10
    Language - 10/10
    Sexual Content - 10/10
    Occult/Supernatural - 10/10
    Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 10/10

    Various animals, friend and enemy, wander the landscape. Dark dots and other creatures serve as the primary enemies. They usually send the player back to a checkpoint after one or two hits--the same number of leaf whacks needed to turn most of them into puffs of smoke. This is the only potential moral concern; games do not get much more family-friendly than Woodle Tree 2. Combat is cumbersome because it is difficult to aim the leaf. The camera does not help matters; it stays close to the player avatar at all times and cannot be panned far up or down. In a move unforgivable in every 3D game since Ocarina of Time, there is no button to reorient the camera behind the character. You usually have plenty of time to move the camera; it's those times that you don't that enemies will be able to reach you.

    The visuals are bland, and the sound is only slightly less so. The collectible masks and leafs are fun while adding little to the experience. The occasional loading or clipping glitch crashed the game. These hiccups ended play sessions and didn't detract from the game much. I did not get to try co-op; however, I feel confident saying that the level design does not encourage multiplayer play. I suspect that after a second player helps you hit a switch to activate a platform, he would just be dead weight who has to wait for the sliding platform to come back down so he can take it up. There is no intrinsic reason to bring along friends for the adventure.

    I enjoyed Woodle Tree 2: Worlds much more than I expected to. The plain world is fun to bounce around in, and the levels are well-constructed. For every time the world disappointed me with an empty dead end, it surprised me with a secret area or interesting new concept. Would I recommend buying it? Probably not for yourself if you are old enough to be reading this review. At the same time, if you buy this game for a youngster who, for one reason or another, doesn't engage with it, try it out yourself. This soothing game might bring a smile to your face.

  •  

    boxart
    Game Info:

    Yoku’s Island Express
    Developed by: Villa Gorilla
    Published by: Team17
    Release date: May 29, 2018
    Available on: PS4, Switch, Windows, Xbox One
    Genre: Pinball, Platformer
    Number of players: Single-player
    ESRB Rating: E10+ for Animated Blood, Crude Humor, Fantasy Violence
    Price: $29.99
    (Amazon Affiliate Link)

    Thank you Team17 for sending us this game to review!

    Yoku is a dung beetle headed to Mokumana Island to become their new postmaster. Unfortunately, tragedy strikes before his arrival as their deity, Mokumana, is attacked and it’s up to Yoku to rally the three island chiefs to save it.

    A dung beetle is an interesting choice for a starring character. Thankfully, most of the time Yoku is rolling around a white pinball. Later on in the game, you can change its color. Though you can move left and right to explore the island, most of the movement in this game is done pinball-style!

    Combining platforming and pinball genres is rather different, but fun. There are also some Metroid-like elements so you can throw Metroidvania into the genre mashup as well. Granted, I prefer having more control of my character like traditional platformers, but I enjoy the pinball aspects quite a bit too. The hand painted levels are very detailed and can be daunting at times when realizing that getting from point A to point B will require a lot of pinball action. Scattered around the levels are several telescopes to give you a broader view of the island to see how close you are to your next objective.

    Yoku’s Island Express
    Highlights:

    Strong Points: Fun mashup of pinball and platformer genres; colorful hand-painted visuals
    Weak Points: Unlike traditional platformers you don’t have complete control over Yoku unless you’re good at pinball or physics
    Moral Warnings: Cartoon violence; slugs explode; yellow blood; potty humor (the main character is a dung beetle)

    Like most platformers, you’ll need to collect stuff. Fruit is the collectible currency on this island. You’ll need to use fruit to unlock bumpers required to access new areas. Sometimes fruit is on the ground waiting to be picked up, but you’ll earn a lot more as you knock it loose in pinball areas. By putting mail in red mailboxes you’ll earn some fruit that way too. Wallet upgrades are worth seeking out as they allow you to carry more fruit at a time. Some of the bumpers cost eighty pieces of fruit to unlock and the beelines that allow you to quickly traverse the island cost one hundred pieces of fruit to activate them. Along with fruit, there are eighty wickerlings to collect during your journey.

    The controls are pretty simple as the left trigger activates the blue flipper and the right trigger moves the yellow flipper. Some bumpers require both triggers to be pressed, but you won’t want to press both triggers all of the time. Many of the pinball sections have locked bumpers that require collecting purple orb-like keys to make them accessible. Other obstacles include boulders that can only be removed by vacuuming up explosive slugs and using them against the giant rocks.

    Yoku’s Island Express
    Score Breakdown:
    Higher is better
    (10/10 is perfect)

    Game Score - 84%
    Gameplay - 16/20
    Graphics - 9/10
    Sound - 8/10
    Stability - 4/5
    Controls - 5/5

    Morality Score - 78%
    Violence - 6/10
    Language - 10/10
    Sexual Content - 10/10
    Occult/Supernatural - 5/10
    Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 8/10

    Along your journey, Yoku will befriend some helpful allies. Kickback the Bee will block some thorny plants and prevent Yoku from getting injured and losing fruit from them. The Dive Fish allows Yoku to go underwater. In the beginning of the game, Yoku gets a party horn that’s useful for waking up slumbering characters and opening up flowers/checkpoints.

    There is some cartoon violence as slugs explode and Yoku has to suck them up with his vacuum tool. In the beginning of the game there’s a giant eel-like creature that demands a toll of a mushroom. Yoku can give the eel a normal mushroom or a poisonous one that knocks it out. There are some boss battles and they’re handled pinball-style.

    Yoku’s Island Express is a silly mashup that works surprisingly well. Because of the lack of control, I only enjoyed this game in small spurts. The game can be completed in six to eight hours depending on how good you are at pinball. If you enjoy platformers, Metroid, and pinball games, Yoku’s Island Express is worth checking out. If you’re still on the fence, there’s a demo available. This is an impressive first entry from Villa Gorilla and I look forward to more titles from them.

  • boxart
    Game Info:

    Yooka-Laylee
    Developed by: Playtonic Games
    Published by: Team17
    Release date: April 11, 2017
    Available on: Linux, macOS, PS4, Switch, Windows, Xbox One
    Genre: Platformer
    Number of players: Single-player, Up to two players for co-op multiplayer
    ESRB Rating: E 10+ for comic mischief
    Price: $39.99
    (Amazon Affiliate Link)

    Thank you Team17 for sending us this game to review!

    The classic 2D Donkey Kong Country and 3D Banjo-Kazooie games bring back many fond memories for gamers who enjoy platformers from the '90s era. What made these games special is their challenge and the thrill of collecting all of the items despite their treacherous locations. The creative talent behind the aforementioned games are on staff at Playtonic Games and their first project, a “Rare-vival” called Yooka-Laylee was successfully Kickstarted in June of 2015. The $175,000 goal was exceeded with its ending amount reaching over 2 million.

    The main characters, the chameleon Yooka and his female bat companion Laylee begin the game lounging around their tropical home in Shipwreck Creek when Capital B and Dr. Quack threaten the existence of all of the world’s literature. Along with many books, the enchanted pages from Yooka and Laylee’s mysterious Grand Tome are taken away from them. They must travel to Hivory Towers to re-collect all of the Pagies and quills scattered throughout the five worlds.

    Each vibrant and 3D rendered world has two hundred quills in it and those are used for purchasing moves from a shady snake seller named Trowzer (trouser snake, get it?). Some of the moves include rolling up slippery slopes and shooting projectiles. Battling against bosses or fully exploring the world will not be possible without these moves, so be sure to buy them early and often. Thankfully, the quills are pretty easy to locate and collect.

    yooka-laylee
    Highlights:

    Strong Points: Nice throwback to '90s classic platformers that require collecting lots of items
    Weak Points: Despite the cute graphics this game can be deceptively hard and may turn away some gamers; confusing level design; annoying voice acting; mini-games are boring when playing solo
    Moral Warnings: Cartoon violence; potty humor; gambling references; sexual innuendo

    Pagies, on the other hand, often take more effort to get. They are used for expanding and opening up new worlds. Each world has twenty-five pages in it and they are usually locked away until a quest of some sort is completed. One of the easier quests is locating the fractions of a page to make a whole one. Other pages can be yours by winning races or by completing timed challenges. If some of the challenges are too much for you, you can skip them, but be warned that one-hundred Pagies will be required to take on the final boss.

    Ghost writers dwell in each world, and they'll reward you with treasure if you get their attention. In order to get them to acknowledge you, you’ll need unlock some of Trowzer’s special moves first. There are some characters who will refuse to talk to you in your chameleon form. When you befriend a scientist named Dr. Puzz, she’ll be able to transform you provided you can get her machine up and running first.

    As you can imagine, the Pagies take a lot more work to get and there are plenty of them to retrieve if you’re a completionist. Besides the main game, there is a retro arcade with a few minigames that can be played by yourself or with a nearby friend, stranger, or family member. Here’s a quick rundown of the minigames:

    Bee Bop – As a bee drone, you must defend your hive from invading enemies
    Blag the Flag – Keep your flag secure from enemies that are after it
    Glaciators – Collect as many quills as you can before the time runs out. You must be wary of the shifting ice and enemies coming at you
    Gun-Tlet Run - Blast away at corplets in this chaotic shoot ‘em up
    Hurdle Hijinx – A poker themed racetrack that requires you to jump and switch lanes to avoid upcoming obstacles
    Jobstacle Course – Collect quills in this shoot 'em up game
    Kartos Karting – See how fast you can complete your laps without hitting obstacles, enemies, or negative power-ups
    Up ‘N’ Nova – Collect quills in this space flying game

    yooka-laylee
    Score Breakdown:
    Higher is better
    (10/10 is perfect)

    Game Score - 78%
    Gameplay - 15/20
    Graphics - 8/10
    Sound - 6/10
    Stability - 5/5
    Controls - 5/5

    Morality Score - 89%
    Violence - 8/10
    Language - 10/10
    Sexual Content - 8/10
    Occult/Supernatural - 10/10
    Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 8.5/10

    Some of the minigames are over when the time runs out while others let you play until your five lives are depleted. When the mini-game ends, your score will be added to the local leaderboard. While these games can be played solo, I highly recommend recruiting a friend. Playing a kart game without any opponents is boring and wrong.

    Yooka-Laylee is mostly kid safe and will hopefully entertain more than frustrate younger gamers. Some of the innuendo went over my head at first, but they're present. There’s cartoon violence and some burping, but that’s as bad it gets. The humor is silly and appreciated.

    In the end, Yooka-Laylee is a cute game with the exception of annoying gibberish voice acting. Aside from that complaint, this title is bound to entertain gamers for a while, but it doesn’t bring anything new to the table. If you’re longing for a retro styled platformer, Yooka-Layee will deliver in spades, but don’t expect anything more and you’ll be happy.

  • boxart
    Game Info:

    Yumi’s Odd Odyssey
    Developed by: Agatsuma Entertainment
    Published by: Natsume
    Release Date: March 20, 2014
    Genre: Platformer/Puzzle
    Number of Players: Single-Player
    ESRB Rating: Everyone
    Price: $29.99

    Thank you Natsume for sending us this game to review!

    Yumi’s Odd Odyssey is the third game in the Umihara Kawase series which is popular in Japan.  This is the first and only game to come to North America.  The series began in 1994 on the Super Famicom system.  The sequels were released on the Japanese PlayStation, PSP, and DS systems.  What sets this series apart from other platformers (other than the bizarre dream world and creatures) is that the main characters are equipped with a bungee-like fishing line that they can attach to surfaces and sling themselves around the level.  Yumi’s Odd Odyssey offers plenty of jumping and climbing to fall under the platformer genre. However, there are many situations that require problem solving skills and a lot of patience to overcome.

    There are fifty stages to complete and many of them can be finished in a couple of minutes or less.  Some levels are more complex, especially when it comes to boss battles.    Most of the levels have backpacks that can be collected.  In the original game, these represented extra lives, but that is not an issue in this release.  You have unlimited retries, and this game counts how many times you have failed a level.   (This feature was not good for my self esteem.) 

    Yumi’s Odd Odyssey
    Highlights:

    Strong Points: The first of this series to come to North America; unique visuals and challenging gameplay 
    Weak Points: If you’re good at this game it can be beaten within a few hours; $30 asking price
    Moral Warnings: Cartoon violence

    To finish a level you must make your way to the exit door and some levels have multiple doors which interconnect to other stages in the game.  There are many obstacles from the beginning to the end of a stage.  You’ll encounter walking fish that make you wonder if the heroines are really small or if the fish are big.  Besides the monsters you can usually hook and reel in, there are slippery ice surfaces and deadly spikes to avoid.  You’ll have to use the environment to your advantage, especially since the bosses are immune to hook attacks.  To make matters worse, all it takes is one hit to send you back to the beginning of the level.

    Fortunately, there are multiple characters to choose from and each provides a helpful and unique ability.  Emiko unlocks check points in levels that can be used once apiece.  (I used her the most!)  Noko provides a slow motion hookshot which can come in handy if you need the extra accuracy.   I was aware of music and feature unlocking as I progressed the story, but these other characters are not mentioned.  Changing characters can be done in the profile menu.  

    There are five endings and I imagine they depend on how many backpacks are collected or by how long it took the user to complete the levels.  The original game gave the best ending for completing the entire game in roughly a half hour. Needless to say, there is plenty of replayability if you have the perseverance.   

    Yumi’s Odd Odyssey
    Score Breakdown:
    Higher is better
    (10/10 is perfect)

    Game Score - 76%
    Gameplay - 14/20
    Graphics - 8/10
    Sound - 8/10
    Stability - 5/5
    Controls - 3/5

    Morality Score - 96%
    Violence - 8/10
    Language - 10/10
    Sexual Content - 10/10
    Occult/Supernatural - 10/10
    Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 10/10

    Yumi’s Odd Odyssey is a niche game that will appeal to those who longed to play the Japanese releases.  The $30 price tag seems a bit steep in my opinion.  There isn’t much of a story to hook you in, but the physics are fun to play around with until you fail the same level forty times or more.   

    The graphics are unique and utilize the 3D effects nicely.  The background is realistic looking while the foreground has various platforms to maneuver through.  I like how there are day and night levels to add some variety and additional challenge.  The disturbing enemies deserve a mention and these including walking fish and pollywogs.     

    The background music is pleasant to listen to but didn’t blow me away.  It was actually a bit soothing while I was getting angry at myself for dying yet again.  While this game is family friendly, I’d be surprised if children would enjoy it given the game’s brutal difficulty.

    Old school gamers should look into Yumi’s Odd Odyssey if they enjoyed previous entries in the Umihara Kawase series.  Anyone else looking for a challenge may be pleasantly surprised with this game as well.  I wish there was a demo available, but sadly there is not.  Thirty dollars is a lot to part with for a game that’s short if you’re good at it and even shorter if you’re fed up with its intense difficulty.

  • boxart
    Game Info:

    Zeran’s Folly
    Developed By: Myroid-Type Comics
    Published By: Myroid-Type Comics
    Released: October 6, 2017
    Available On: Windows
    Genre: Action-Adventure, 2D Platformer
    ESRB Rating: No Rating
    Number of Players: 1
    Price: $9.99 (via Steam), Free (Standard download via IndieDB)

    Thank you Myroid-Type Comics for the review code.

    Steam as of recently has been releasing loads of games, some of questionable quality on their platform. Not all of the games that will be released will be good, let alone functional, but it also gives the option of lesser known games to reach a wider audience that it otherwise were unable to. Zeran’s Folly is one of those low profile games that tend to get buried underneath the titanic releases.

    Zeran’s Folly stars an amnesiac named Lone, who wakes up on an island. He doesn’t remember how he got there nor why he was there in the first place, but he knows he has to collect various artifacts to restore his lost memories. Along the journey, he comes across numerous characters who aid him. Zeran’s Folly is a 2D action-adventure platfomer with seven worlds to explore, seven playable characters, and enemies that want you dead. When the game begins, you only have control of Lone, but as you continue the story, you will come across three other main characters important to the narrative, while the remaining three characters are purely optional and one would have to complete some sort of side quest to unlock them. Characters can be swapped with the simple press of a button, at any point of the game, except for specific story moments.

    The game puts a pretty heavy emphasis on platforming, as there are many obstacles in the way. The movement is very responsive which is great for a platfomer as the character controls how you want it to. The combat is pretty simple, as there is only one button used to attack, and if the button is held, the character can use a focus attack (that ability is locked at first) or if the down direction is held while pressing attack, one can use a slide technique. It may have a simple control scheme, but the game has quite the layers to it, as many actions affect your character’s momentum. For example, if one uses the slide off a ledge, the character will rocket in the direction. Utilizing the mechanics of the game, one can go very fast through the world. The health system runs off of hearts, where most attacks do half a heart and few can do up to two hearts worth of damage. At the beginning, you start off with four hearts, but can obtain up to ten.

    Zeran’s Folly
    Highlights:

    Strong Points: Smooth and responsive platforming and combat mechanics, a nice color pallet and cute art style that breathes life into the world, multiple playable characters that can be swapped between instantly.
    Weak Points: Field of view is rather small which can lead to some cheap moments, a rather meh story that ends very abruptly, enemy variety is rather lacking.
    Moral Warnings: A very crude and degenerate game that shows and mentions various things such as jokes of a sexual nature, nudity, strong language, and violence. Game features Templars that are portrayed as the bad guys.

    Upgrades for your character exist such as rings which follow a level up system and can also be upgraded. The rings can give your character bonus effects such as a higher chance to spawn hearts or being able to stick to walls. Each character also has talents, that unlike rings are unique to the specific character that earns them. Talents are obtained by talking to certain NPCs as certain characters so its a good choice in the overworld to talk to characters multiple times. Each character also has various outfits to buy and unlock, but they only make a cosmetic difference and are there for visual preference.

    The death mechanics of the game are of an infinite spawn variety, as there are various monoliths called Whisper Stones that act as checkpoints. These stones also act as your teleporters throughout the dungeons. When one dies, they are simply brought back to the last checkpoint touched (as there is no life system) while all progress obtained such as keys, and treasure is kept. This has given the developer the liberty to make the game quite challenging as there is generally little penalty for dying except for just doing certain parts over. It posses enough to give a good challenge for a seasoned player to enjoy themselves, but casual players can also backtrack to restock on supplies if a situation is too tough for them.

    The art style is colorful and vibrant, giving the world life. The scenery is also pretty good as the areas do have a lot of variation from one other. The characters have a cuteness to them that is rather charming. The music is also catchy, consisting of many rock based tracks unique to the game. It suits the tone, but it's nothing that you'll be humming in your mind when taking a stroll.

    I said plenty of good things about the game, but it is not without its fair share of flaws. There were some points where platforms were hard to see. It was almost like the platforms blended into the background, which annoyed me quite a bit, especially when this was encountered early on. The field of view is rather small. For some platformers, this isn’t a huge deal, but for a game that requires up and down movement as well as left and right, this can lead to some rather frustrating moments. The game utilizes a lot of spikes, pits and enemies attacking off screen which means one can be subjected to some rather cheap forms of damage as well as leaps of faith. The enemy variety also stinks as after the second dungeon, you’ve pretty much seen all the enemy variety and the rest of the game simply has color and pallet swaps of the same enemies you’ve fought at the beginning. Typically I wouldn’t take points off for a game with a weak narrative, but the game (and the developer) seems to have taken pride in the story. There is one difficulty that lets people “enjoy the story” by giving out various bonuses at the beginning but the story doesn’t do anything unique or risky. It’s just kinda there to give the characters the excuse to move from one point to another, ending on a very abrupt note. 

    Zeran’s Folly
    Score Breakdown:
    Higher is better
    (10/10 is perfect)

    Game Score - 74%
    Gameplay - 15/20
    Graphics - 7/10
    Sound - 6/10
    Stability - 4/5
    Controls - 4/5

    Morality Score - 20%
    Violence - 2.5/10
    Language - 0/10
    Sexual Content - 1/10
    Occult/Supernatural - 1.5/10
    Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 2/10
    (+3 for importance of family values)

    So, the game is a 2D platformer, with colorful cartoon graphics, and cute characters. You may think this game would be appropriate for all ages, but it's quite the contrary. I’d advise for all kids to stay away from this game. Zeran's Folly is very crude and prides itself on degeneracy. The game has humor in it, but its humor is heavily reliant on its crudeness. Through its dialogue, there are references to incest, pedophilia, many sexual innuendos and outright sexual acts, every swear word in the book, and a few instances of blasphemy. It doesn’t even end there: nearly every enemy when killed explodes into chunks of flesh and bones, there is a boss that looks like a certain male sexual organ, as well as a fully nude boss, and there are even sexual acts performed in the game such as urolagnia and fellatio. The game gets so crazy with its vulgarity that it even surprised me at times, and I find myself a pretty hard person to offend. There are even Templars that are portrayed as the villains and magic is pretty prominent throughout the game, where one player character is based around it. There is still more to say, but some of the things do verge into spoiler territory. It gets to the point where some may find all of it juvenile and tasteless and can drive some people away from a game that they would otherwise enjoy. Even though the game relies on offensive humor, it does uphold good values on friends and family.

    Zeran’s Folly is a pretty unique case. There exists a free version to download off the internet so that people can try it out, but the free version lacks things that the Steam version does. The Steam version gets updates, a new game+ option, an optional randomly generated dungeon to explore, and the three optional player characters.

    When playing through this game, I felt an odd sense of nostalgia. It reminded me of my past when I used to play those silly flash games on websites such as Newgrounds or AddictingGames. Everything about it reminds me of a flash game, from the presentation, the look, and even the raunchy humor, but with a bit more finesse and polish. For me it hit just enough marks that I can safely say I enjoyed the game. For a game made by one person, its pretty competent. The fast pace and tight control can satisfy fans of platfomers, and even through the game only takes 7-10 hours for a standard playthrough, there's plenty to come back for, such as NG+, the extra dungeons, collecting all the abilities, rings, characters, outfits or even the achievements. It does have some rather annoying issues to stop it from being an exceptional platform game as well as its crude humor and explicitness alienates a fair share of players but for a game made by one person, it’s a good and enjoyable time for the ones who either enjoy or are indifferent towards ostentatious games.


    -Cinque Pierre

     

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About Us:

Christ Centered Gamer looks at video games from two view points. We analyze games on a secular level which will break down a game based on its graphics, sound, stability and overall gaming experience. If you’re concerned about the family friendliness of a game, we have a separate moral score which looks at violence, language, sexual content, occult references and other ethical issues.

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